Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCongressional leaders downplay possibility of Capitol closing due to coronavirusOcasio-Cortez says candidate she backed in Texas Democratic primary ‘came closer than anyone imagined’Henry Cuellar fends off Democratic challenger in Texas House primaryMORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday expressed optimism that the U.S. will eventually elect a female president, despite it being virtually certain that the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee will be a man after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann Warren Sanders condemns his supporters’ ‘ugly, personal attacks’ against WarrenThe Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden riding wave of momentum after stunning Super TuesdayDelegate battle ahead likely favors BidenMORE (D-Mass.) withdrew from the race earlier in the day.
Pelosi acknowledged that it won’t be this year given the likely choice between the major parties of President TrumpDonald John TrumpAs Biden surges, GOP Ukraine probe moves to the forefrontRepublicans, rooting for Sanders, see Biden wins as setbackTrump says Biden Ukraine dealings will be a ‘major’ campaign issueMORE and either former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenAs Biden surges, GOP Ukraine probe moves to the forefrontRepublicans, rooting for Sanders, see Biden wins as setbackSanders says Biden winning African American support by ‘running with his ties to Obama’MORE or Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersRepublicans, rooting for Sanders, see Biden wins as setbackSanders says Biden winning African American support by ‘running with his ties to Obama’ Sanders condemns his supporters’ ‘ugly, personal attacks’ against WarrenMORE (I-Vt.), but maintained that women are making “progress” following the record number of women elected to the House in 2018 and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonAs Biden surges, GOP Ukraine probe moves to the forefrontRepublicans, rooting for Sanders, see Biden wins as setbackSanders says Biden winning African American support by ‘running with his ties to Obama’MORE becoming the Democratic nominee four years ago.
“We’ll have a woman president. I know we will. I don’t know who it is quite yet,” Pelosi, the only woman to serve as Speaker to date, said at an event at the Georgetown University Institute of Politics and Public Service moderated by SiriusXM’s Julie Mason.
The Democratic presidential field at one point included as many as six women, including Warren, Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardHillicon Valley: Lawmakers seek 5G rivals to Huawei | Amazon, eBay grilled over online counterfeits | Judge tosses Gabbard lawsuit against Google | GOP senator introduces bill banning TikTok on government devicesDelegate battle ahead likely favors BidenJudge tosses Gabbard lawsuit against GoogleMORE (Hawaii), author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson rips Buttigieg, Klobuchar for endorsing BidenSanders zeroes-in on Super Tuesday statesMarianne Williamson endorses Sanders at Texas rallyMORE, and Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBiden surge calms Democratic jitters Delegate battle ahead likely favors BidenHow the Democratic candidates should talk to voters about CubaMORE (Minn.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandEstablishment Democrats rallying behind BidenNow is the time for a US data protection agencyThe Hill’s Campaign Report: Warren up, Bloomberg down after brutal debateMORE (N.Y.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisDemocratic presidential race comes into sharp focusDemocratic candidates gear up for a dramatic Super TuesdayThe Memo: Biden needs blowout SC win to reshape raceMORE (Calif.).
Gabbard is the only female candidate who has still not exited the race, but her candidacy remains a long shot and polls in the single digits.
Pelosi suggested that the size of the primary field may have contributed to the female candidates having difficulty consolidating enough support to break through to the top of the pack.
“This time, the field was so big, the support so spread, perhaps if there hadn’t been so many different candidates then a focus on one or two to begin with…would have been different,” Pelosi said.
“But there were a lot of men who didn’t make the cut either,” Pelosi added.
She suggested that fewer women seem to either promote themselves as potential presidential material or have supporters urging them to run compared to men.
“I haven’t necessarily seen that around women. Hillary, yes,” she said.
She also took the opportunity to give advice to the assembled Georgetown University students in the audience who might consider running for public office themselves.
“Just build your confidence, but also take stock of what you have to offer, whether you’re running for office or running for president.”
Earlier Thursday, Pelosi said that an element of misogyny undermines female presidential candidates like Warren.
“I do think there’s a certain element of misogyny that is there and some of it isn’t really mean spirited. It just isn’t their experience,” Pelosi said at a press conference in the Capitol.
“Many of them will tell you they had a strong mom, they have strong sisters, they have strong daughters. But they have their own insecurities, I guess you would say.”